Owen Calvert Photography
Owen Calvert Photography

exhibitions

exhibitions

 

exhibitions

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March, 2018

A Journey Through Brutalism
RISE Gallery, Croydon, London
https://www.rise-gallery.co.uk/exhibition/a-journey-through-brutalism

One of the exhibiting artists. Selected Brutalist pieces only.

"‘A Journey Through Brutalism’ is an exhibition presenting artistic homages to the versatile and majestic architectural form through a wide range of media.

Brutalism became popular with governmental and institutional clients, because of concrete’s cost advantage: it is cheap and abundant, the second most consumed material in the world, after water. Architects of the era shared these ideals, and Croydon is one of the only London boroughs where you can see so many examples of their creations, with no less than 45 office blocks (mostly skyscrapers) built – an impressive 6 million square feet in all!

Today, Croydon’s reputation remains largely based on the Brutalist footprint of yesteryear. This exhibition looks at Brutalist architecture; past, present and future, with a particular focus on the London Borough of Croydon and celebrating its architectural heritage."
 

 
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February 2018

MONO
Sprout Arts Gallery, Tooting, London
https://www.facebook.com/events/175389039891772

My first exhibition. A total of 27 photographs of British architecture and street photography.

"MONO. - a collection of black and white photographs that explore how architecture and the urban landscape have an impact on the human psyche. 

From the foreboding and uncompromising concrete forms of Brutalism (notably the Barbican Estate and the National Theatre) to the mesmerising textures of England's architectural landmarks (Tate Modern and the Bull Ring), architecture shapes and defines the urban environment. Whilst these structures evoke a sense of sublimity within the city, they cannot help but remind us of our insignificance as we dwell and linger inside the metropolis.

The photographs in MONO. evoke the sense of isolation, showing shadowy and solitary individuals that become marginalised by the overpowering concrete in a clustered and chaotic urban environment."